Although Tituba's role in the Salem Witch Trials serves as one of the main focuses of the novel, the experiences that lead to the accusations are what capture the reader's attention.

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem - Part 1, Chapters 6, 7 and 8 Summary & Analysis Maryse Condé This Study Guide consists of approximately 44 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. Tituba was a slave who worked for Samuel Parris during the Salem Witch Trials of 1692.. In I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem, Condé has fictionally rewritten Tituba into the history of the trials, records of which reveal little about her.

As the character states, “I can look for my story among those witches of Salem, but it […] Maryse Condé brings Tituba out of historical silence and creates for her a fictional childhood, adolescence, and old age. Many specifics about her life are unknown, and the historical accounts about her are often contradictory. [4] Ironically, in spite of being the Devil's most loyal and pious servant, the Devil blinded Tituba for her treachery against Mary Sibley. Condé also weaves the thread of a Trinitarian model of the three woman family with Tituba, Abena, and Mama Yaya. This wild and entertaining novel expands on the true story of the West Indian slave Tituba, who was accused of witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts, arrested in 1692, and forgotten in jail until the general amnesty for witches two years later. Maryse Condé, in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem, utilizes religious imagery and the changing views of Tituba, in her descriptions of Salem and …show more content… The religious imagery in the ship’s name “Christ the King” shows a dichotomy of ideas and values, and reveals some of the hypocrisy of the religious English settlers. Tituba Tituba was a historical figure who testified during the Salem witch trials. Although Tituba's role in the Salem Witch Trials serves as one of the main focuses of the novel, the experiences that lead to the accusations are what capture the reader's attention. She is believed to have been from the West Indies.Ethnically, she has been described as Native American, half Native American, Native West … By entering your email address you agree to receive emails from Shmoop and verify that you are over the age of 13.

Tituba was a slave in Salem, Massachusetts and was one of the first people persecuted in the Salem Witch Trials between 1691 and 1692. This novel explored the trials of slaves displaced in a new and unknown environment. “I, Tituba Black Witch of Salem” was a great depiction of the African American struggle between self and new-found self in foreign territory. Immediately download the I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays, quotes, character descriptions, lesson plans, and more - everything you need for studying or teaching I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.

The book I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem by Maryse Boucolon is loosely based on an historical figure, Tituba, a woman possibly of Native American, African, or mixed descent. Historically Tituba was the first to be accused of witchcraft in Salem, but was never executed, and it is unknown what had happened to Tituba after the Salem Witch Trials. The main character Tituba had numerous internal conflicts that made life very difficult for her. Condé also weaves the thread of a Trinitarian model of the three woman family with Tituba, Abena, and Mama Yaya. The various documents and books about the Salem Witch Trials over the years often refer to Tituba as black or mixed race but the actual court documents from her trial refer to her as an “Indian woman, servant.”.