For whom the Bell Tolls John Donne. Perhaps Donne’s most famous prose, “Meditation 17,” is the source of at least two popular quotations: “No man is an island” and (not his exact words) “Ask not for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

PERCHANCE he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill, as that he knows not it tolls for him; and perchance I may think myself so much better than I am, as that they who are about me, and see my state, may have caused it to toll for me, and I know not that. The words of the original passage are as follows: Each is a piece of the continent, A part of the main.

Donne writes that no person stands alone—“No man is an island, entire of itself”—because everyone belongs to a community. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less. For whom the bell tolls, It tolls for thee. This epigraph is from a short essay by the seventeenth-century British poet John Donne. The For Whom The Bell Tolls by John Donne.

For Whom the Bell Tolls opens with an epigraph, a short quotation that introduces the novel, sets the mood, and presents a theme. As well as if a manner of thine own Or of thine friend's were. Each is a piece of the continent, A part of the main.

The title "For Whom the Bell Tolls" comes from this statement written by John Donne in his book "Devotions upon Emergent Occasions": No man is an island, Entire of itself. As well as if a promontory were. PERCHANCE he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill, as that he knows not it tolls for him; and perchance I may think myself so much better than I am, as that they who are about me, and see my state, may have caused it to toll for me, and I know not that. No man is an island, Entire of itself. For whom the Bell Tolls PERCHANCE he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill, as that he knows not it tolls for him; and perchance I may think myself so much better than I am, as that they who are about me, and see my state, may have caused it to toll for me, and I know not that. For whom the bell tolls a poem (No man is an island) by John Donne These famous words by John Donne were not originally written as a poem - the passage is taken from the 1624 Meditation 17, from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and is prose. For whom the bell tolls definition, a novel (1940) by Ernest Hemingway. XVII. Summary: Epigraph. MEDITATION. The church is Catholic, universal, so are all her actions; all that she does belongs to all. Album Poems of John Donne. ... therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee. Meditation XVII. See more. John Donne > Quotes > Quotable Quote “Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee.” ― John Donne, Meditation XVII - Meditation 17