Say's Phoebe: Medium-sized, active flycatcher with gray-brown upperparts and head, paler gray throat and upper breast, and pale rufous belly and undertail coverts.

Like other phoebes, the Say's phoebe wags its tail while perched. Like other phoebes, the Say’s Phoebe is seemingly undaunted by people and often nests on buildings.

The genus Sayornis is a small group of medium-sized insect-eating birds, known as phoebes, in the tyrant flycatcher family Tyrannidae. Seemingly quite tame, it often nests around buildings and bridges where it is easily observed. The genus name Sayornis is constructed from the specific part of Charles Lucien Bonaparte's name for Say's phoebe, Muscicapa saya, and Ancient Greek ornis, "bird". The drab appearance of this species makes it easy to overlook in its sparse habitats, but its “melancholy” call is distinctive.

For best results, place the shelf on a building under an eave or overhang. In agricultural fields, Alaskan cliff faces and rural homes and barns, individuals or pairs sit upright wagging their tails up and down. Sometimes alters the two phrases. It is among the earliest of migrants, bringing hope that spring is at hand. Look For A medium-sized gray-brown flycatcher with rufous pink sides and a square black tail.

It is typical of prairies, badlands, and ranch country, often placing its nest under the eaves of a porch or barn.

Listen to Say's phoebe on bird-sounds.net - a comprehensive collection of North American bird songs and bird calls. ... Open-country birds, Say's Phoebes are found in steppe and agricultural habitats in eastern Washington, especially treeless areas with cliffs and other sites for nesting. Say’s Phoebe This widespread western species is frequently seen perching on bushes, boulders, fences, and utility wires. Like other phoebes, the Say’s Phoebe is seemingly undaunted by people and often nests on buildings. Say’s Phoebe is a year-round resident in the Trans-Pecos and western Edwards Plateau regions with winter visitors scattered across southern Texas. The English Phoebe is a name for the Roman moon-goddess Diana. A pair may investigate potential nest sites together; the male engages in nest-showing displays while the female may show nest-shaping movements (i.e., rotating from side … Minnesota Breeding Bird Distribution* At the time that Roberts was gathering information for his 1932 book on Minnesota avifauna, there were no records of the Say’s Phoebe in the state.

Listen For A sad-sounding, down-slurred call: pee-yerr or pyeer. Dark eye line stands out on gray head. ; 3 in North America). Weak fluttering flight with shallow wing beats.

Despite its plain appearance, this flycatcher is often a favorite among eastern birdwatchers. Polytypic (4 ssp. Polytypic (4 ssp.

The first documented observation (September 3, 1963) was of a migrant found in Winona County (Einhorn 1969).Subsequently, a specimen was discovered in the collection at the College of St. Benedict, …

They make their nest of grass and moss and stick it onto shady protected parts of cliffs, Feeds primarily on insects.

They sally from low perches to snatch insects in midair or pounce on them on the ground. Hawks from perch, hovers. These open-country birds have cinnamon-washed underparts and a rather gentle expression. Say’s Phoebe has benefited from the use of human-made structures for nest sites. Say’s Phoebe This widespread western species is frequently seen perching on bushes, boulders, fences, and utility wires. The wings and tail are dark gray.

Conservation status. Best of all, its gentle tail-wagging habit and soft fee-bee song make the Phoebe easy to identify, unlike many flycatchers.